Bloodhound Training – Search & Rescue

Last summer, Barry and I met a woman with a bloodhound puppy at the fair. While talking with her she mentioned that she had another bloodhound and that she was part of a Search & Rescue training group based out of Roanoke. She got our contact information and invited us out to the next training.

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

Since August 2014 we have been to five or so trainings, which typically take place on the weekend. Our training sites have included the ‘urban’ downtown Roanoke area, an industrial park setting, and various parks.

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

Training in the woods at a park.

Hank and Scout have been thriving at these trainings, and continue to improve and learn new things each time. We work on man trailing (following the trail of a person until the person is found), identifying someone in a line up, and identifying human remains (cadaver work).

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

Lineup training

For the man trailing and line up work, the dogs are given the scent they need to find using a ‘scent article.’ In a real world setting, this could be any item (often clothing) with the subject’s scent on it, the subject being the person you’re looking for. For training, the scent article is typically a paper towel that the subject has rubbed on his or her face and neck. Each paper towel is put in it’s own bag, and we keep them on the vehicle for each person so that they’re available for use.

Scent articles tucked under the windshield wipers.

Scent articles tucked under the windshield wipers.

At the start of each trail, the dog is given then scent by allowing them to sniff the scent article. Our dogs will sniff it just by us opening the bag. Others choose to place the bag briefly on their dog’s face to give them the scent. Either way works. For lineup work, the dog is given the scent and then identifies the subject from a line up. Hank indicates by placing his front paws on the person, while Scout indicates by sitting down. Here’s a series of photos that shows another dog doing lineup work at a recent training.

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

Like Hank, this dog’s indicator is using his front paws on the subject.

Hank and Scout have both done well with lineup work, although they both seem to prefer actual tracking. Hank, especially, loves nothing more than a long trail. At a recent training, he followed a trail that started in a parking lot and went to the top of the ridgeline, both pictured below.

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

The trail started with giving Hank the scent of the subject he was going to be tracking.

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

Then it was time to get started! Hank is always wide open during these trainings, and he takes off right away. He’s very motivated, which is a good thing. That’s something they look for in a Search & Rescue dog.

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

This particular trail quickly transitioned off of the pavement and onto the grass before heading into the woods. The dogs do best with trails that are on grass and dirt, but they are getting better at pavement as well.

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

Once on the trail Hank really took off and I had a hard time keeping up with Barry and him. A little trail running got added to the mix.

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

Tearing up the side of the mountain.

Hank didn’t hesitate at all with any obstacles on the trail, and it wasn’t too long until we made it to the top of the mountain and found the subject Hank was tracking. He is always so proud of himself at the end of a trail!

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

When the dogs finish a trail, they give their indicator, and then we have a big over exaggerated celebration. We also carry treats for them, although they’re often not interested in them at the end of tracking for some reason.

Scout has a slightly more laid back approach to tracking than Hank. She’s still excellent at it, she just doesn’t do it at a sprint the way Hank does. That makes us a pretty good pair, since I’m able to both control and keep up with her.

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

Preparing for a trail

This particular trail went down a paved path, across a road, and a little further down a paved path. You can see her subject in the distance in the second picture below. You can also see that Scout is tracking solely using her nose, and is not looking up and trying to look around (which is what you want).

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

Hank and Scout seem to really enjoy these trainings. However, Scout is usually pretty quick to lose interest, and typically only does three trails/lineup’s or so during training. That’s okay, though. We want to keep things fun for the dogs so that they don’t lose interest.

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

Hank and Scout clearly have a great time at training.

As you saw in the above pictures, the dogs each use a harness and a long, 30 foot leash, while tracking. We only attach the leash to their harness when it is time to work. When they are done on a trail, we switch the leash back to their collar so that they know they are done. When it is time to follow a trail we use the command “Go Find.” If they get distracted during a trail, we use the command “Back to Work.” We also give them a bit of encouragement along the way, by saying “Good Girl/Boy.”

Another type of work Search & Rescue dogs train for is cadaver work. This involves working with the dogs in identifying human remains. You don’t use the “Go Find” command, because the dog is not searching for a person. But you also don’t want to outright say what the dog is looking for either, in case there is family nearby at an actual search. So each handler has his/her own command to tell the dog they are looking for human remains. Ours is “leftovers,” while others in the group use “sticks and things” and “hueso” (which is Spanish for bone).

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

We have some actual human remains that are used as training aids. They are in containers in the metal box on the ground, just above Hank’s head in the middle picture above. He has done some work with HR, but does not seem to like this as much as finding a person. Scout, on the other hand, has shown much more aptitude for cadaver work. In the below series of pictures you can see her tracking, finding the box of remains, and giving her identification (by sitting).

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

At the end of each training, I record the details in Hank and Scout’s training log. The weather conditions can have a big effect on how well training goes, so I always include them in each entry. I also keep track of what type of location we were at, and what types of trails the dogs did.

DSCN3363

I’m not sure if we will go all the way and officially become Search & Rescue certified. There is quite a lot involved with an official certification, including some obedience things that would be pretty tough for our dogs (like staying in a sit, stay for 10 minutes while the handler walks away). For now we really enjoy training with the group and letting the dogs do what they were born to do. They seem to really enjoy it, too.

Bloodhound Search & Rescue Training man trailing tracking Blue Ridge Bloodhounds

In total, there are seven handlers and nine dogs that are currently part of the group. At our last training, we decided to get a group picture (with eight of the dogs). Some of the dogs don’t get along, especially the intact males (which includes Hank), so it was pretty interesting trying to figure out how we could all line up. Kind of like a puzzle.

Blue Ridge Bloodhound Search & Rescue Bloodhound Man Trailing Bloodhound tracking

Dog names from L to R: Winston, Daisy, Chester, Bubbles, Dutchess, Hank, Scout, and Berkley.

It was quite a feat to get everyone lined up for the picture and to try and get all the dogs to hold still. This was the best we could get! Maybe we’ll give it another go on a different day.

Hank and Scout put a lot into each training, and are always so sleepy afterwards.

Bloodhounds

It takes them a few days to recover. But trust me, those are some happy pups.

If you have pets, have you ever done a specific type of training with them (obedience, agility, search & rescue, etc.)?

10 Comments

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  1. Your dogs look like such nice dogs and now I see that they’re well-trained, too! Even if you don’t become certified, it’s a great learning time for your dogs and I can see that you have fun, too!
    Tina@GottaRunNow recently posted…Highlights: Strength Training, Races & MoreMy Profile

    1. They are very friendly with people 🙂 They’re really great at tracking, because it’s in their nature, but their obedience training is only so-so. Bloodhounds are very stubborn!

  2. This is awesome! Thanks for a great re-cap of the training. Can I ask if you pay for this training? It sounds like a great way to tire out the dogs, for sure. Also, I am pretty sure my dogs would hyperventilate if I made them sit-stay for 10 minutes and I left them! They (especially Zoey) are a little needy. Are you planning to bred Hank?
    Amy recently posted…Halfway ThereMy Profile

    1. We don’t pay for each training or anything, but there is a membership fee to be part of the organization. It is definitely a great way to tire out the dogs, and I love doing something that they love so much because it’s what they were made to do. We don’t have concrete plans to breed Hank, but we did want to keep that option open because he comes from a great line and has such a great personality. Bloodhounds often have litters of 10-12 pups, so I definitely didn’t want to be the one in charge of the momma or finding a home for all of those pups, but we wouldn’t mind to provide the sire for a litter.

  3. I taught mine how to sleep on the furniture and eat twice a day.

    LUD.

  4. I was hoping you’d write a post on this. It’s so interesting to hear how they learn to track! It sounds like a fun activity for the dogs (and for you) even if you never completely become certified. I saw a truck with a decal for bloodhounds on it the other day (like they raised bloodhounds and had a business). I was going to take a pic but I was driving. LOL! I’ve never actually seen a bloodhound so it’s fun to learn about yours.
    jan recently posted…Snowtorious BIGMy Profile

    1. It took me awhile to formulate it in a way that I felt made sense, without being too wordy. It’s a lot of fun being around others who own bloodhounds. Even though each dog has a different personality, they each fit certain stereotypes of the breed. It’s funny you said something about never having seen a bloodhound in person. We get people coming up to us all of the time when we have our dogs out in public saying that they’ve only ever seen them on TV/in movies.

  5. That sounds like such a fun outing for the four of you. Would you ever consider taking Hank and Scout on a trail run with you?
    Debbie @ Deb Runs recently posted…From Football To FeetMy Profile

    1. It is, and I think we’re all usually pretty worn out afterwards. I have tried running with both dogs separately, when they were younger, and it just doesn’t work unfortunately. It’s not enjoyable for either party. They want to stop and sniff everything and I want to run, so either we’re stopping (which makes me unhappy) or I’m dragging them along without letting them explore (which makes them unhappy). They do better on walks where I’m okay with stopping to explore every interesting scent 🙂

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